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Migraine in the workplace: advocating for change and support


1- Getting to Know the colleagues Employers should be aware of those who have migraine in the workplace and learn more about migraine.  Educating all staff members about migraine. Learning that not everyone who looks well, feels well. Provide training such as stress management.  2- Improving office design Having areas with adjustable lighting.  Having areas with less noise. Having a perfumes-free area at work with good ventilation.  Providing ergonomic chairs and desks.  Having glare-free lights in the office. Providing low flicker, or non-flickering screens. Having easily accessible drinking water.    3- Providing work flexibility Helping the staff to have a better work/life balance. Providing breaks for short rests, having food and medications.  Providing options to work from home if needed. Providing flexible work hours, especially during menstruation or while having other unavoidable triggers.  Providing a resting room (dark area) for the staff.  4- Referring to receiving care Refer staff to healthcare providers if needed.
Supporting people with Migraine at workplace

Do workplaces provide an inclusive and understanding environment for those with migraine?



I was very pleased to be invited as a researcher in the field of headache disorders to a recent meeting called “Keeping women with migraine in the workforce” organised by the Brain Foundation at Parliament House in Canberra.



Read about it at the link below:




Hopefully, we can all play our part in creating a more inclusive and understanding workplace environment for those with this condition. 



Some suggestions:


Supporting people with Migraine at workplace:



1- Getting to Know the colleagues


Employers should be aware of those who have migraine in the workplace and learn more about migraine. 


Educating all staff members about migraine.


Learning that not everyone who looks well, feels well.


Provide training such as stress management.



2- Improving office design


Having areas with adjustable lighting. 


Having areas with less noise.


Having a perfumes-free area at work with good ventilation. 


Providing ergonomic chairs and desks. 


Having glare-free lights in the office.


Providing low flicker, or non-flickering screens.


Having easily accessible drinking water. 




3- Providing work flexibility


Helping the staff to have a better work/life balance.


Providing breaks for short rests, having food and medications. 


Providing options to work from home if needed.


Providing flexible work hours, especially during menstruation or while having other unavoidable triggers. 


Providing a resting room (dark area) for the staff.



4- Referring to receiving care


Refer staff to healthcare providers if needed.

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